It is 1976..So why that summer ?

That year, that summer. What a year and it is still talked about with great fondness by the Class of 77. We were in the Lower 6th form. We were a year on from O Levels (as was) and a year away from A levels..so it was party time much to the chgrin of the staff! We were also beginning to get mopeds and motorcycles and even cars..things were gettin’ better !
The 40th anniversary reunion, July 2017
The summer of 1976 was the hottest summer in the UK since records began. As well as the heat, Britain was in the middle of a severe drought. The temperature reached 80°F (26.7°C) every day between 22 June and 16 July. The truly remarkable heat wave was in late June and early July. For 15 consecutive days from 23 June to 7 July inclusive, temperatures reached 90°F (32.2°C) somewhere in England on each of these 15 days. Furthermore, five days saw temperatures exceed 95°F (35°C). On 28 June, temperatures reached 35.6°C (96.1°F) in Southampton, the highest June temperature recorded in the UK. The hottest day of all was 3 July, with temperatures reaching 35.9°C (96.6°F) in Cheltenham, one of the hottest July days on record in the UK. The great drought was due to a very long dry period. The summer and autumn of 1975 were very dry, and the winter of 1975- 76 was exceptionally dry, as was the spring of 1976, indeed some months during this period had no rain at all in some areas. The drought was at its most severe in August 1976. Parts of the south west went 45 days without any rain in July and August. As the hot, dry weather continued, devastating heath and forest fires broke out in parts of Southern England. 50,000 trees were destroyed at Hurn Forest in Dorset. Crops were badly hit, with £500 million worth of crops failing. Food prices subsequently increased by 12% [1]. The effect on domestic water supplies led to the passing of a Drought Act by parliament and Minister for Drought, Denis Howell, was appointed. There was widespread water rationing and public standpipes in some affected areas. Reservoirs were at an extremely low level, as were some rivers. The rivers Don, Sheaf, Shire Brook and Meers Brook (all in Sheffield) all ran completely dry, without a drop of water in any of them, as well as Frecheville Pond and Carterhall Pond (Carterhall Pond was permanently dry until 2007, when floods hit, and has never dried since). In the Central England Temperature series 1976 has the hottest summer for more than 350 years and probably for much longer. The average temperature over the whole summer (June, July, August) was 17.77°C, compared to the average for the unusually warm current decade (2001-2008) of 16.30°C.[1] There have in other years been hotter specific summer months, though. For the entire period much of Europe was bathed in continual sunshine with the United Kingdom seeing an average of more than 14 hours of sunshine per day. 1976 was dubbed "The year of the Ladybird" in that country due to the rise in the mass numbers of ladybirds brought on by the long hot period. "The long hot summer of 1976 which eventually ended in September of that year, was the culmination of a 16-week dry spell - the longest recorded over England and Wales since 1727. The BBC recall the summer of ‘76 (from 2013)
© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem 2014
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It is 1976..So why that summer ?

That year, that summer. What a year and it is still talked about with great fondness by the Class of 77. We were in the Lower 6th form. We were a year on from O Levels (as was) and a year away from A levels..so it was party time much to the chgrin of the staff! We were also beginning to get mopeds and motorcycles and even cars..things were gettin’ better !

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The summer of 1976 was the hottest summer in the UK since records began. The temperature reached 80°F (26.7°C) every day between 22 June and 16 July. The truly remarkable heat wave was in late June and early July. For 15 consecutive days from 23 June to 7 July inclusive, temperatures reached 90°F (32.2°C) somewhere in England on each of these 15 days. Furthermore, five days saw temperatures exceed 95°F (35°C). On 28 June, temperatures reached 35.6°C (96.1°F) in Southampton, the highest June temperature recorded in the UK. The hottest day of all was 3 July, with temperatures reaching 35.9°C (96.6°F) in Cheltenham, one of the hottest July days on record in the UK. The drought was at its most severe in August 1976. Parts of the south west went 45 days without any rain in July and August. As the hot, dry weather continued, devastating heath and forest fires broke out in parts of Southern England. 50,000 trees were destroyed at Hurn Forest in Dorset. Crops were badly hit, with £500 million worth of crops failing. Food prices subsequently increased by 12% [1]. The effect on domestic water supplies led to the passing of a Drought Act by parliament and Minister for Drought, Denis Howell, was appointed. There was widespread water rationing and public standpipes in some affected areas. Reservoirs were at an extremely low level, as were some rivers. The rivers Don, Sheaf, Shire Brook and Meers Brook (all in Sheffield) all ran completely dry, without a drop of water in any of them, as well as Frecheville Pond and Carterhall Pond (Carterhall Pond was permanently dry until 2007, when floods hit, and has never dried since). In the Central England Temperature series 1976 has the hottest summer for more than 350 years and probably for much longer. The average temperature over the whole summer (June, July, August) was 17.77°C, compared to the average for the unusually warm current decade (2001-2008) of 16.30°C.[1] There have in other years been hotter specific summer months, though. For the entire period much of Europe was bathed in continual sunshine with the United Kingdom seeing an average of more than 14 hours of sunshine per day. 1976 was dubbed "The year of the Ladybird" in that country due to the rise in the mass numbers of ladybirds brought on by the long hot period. "The long hot summer of 1976 which eventually ended in September of that year, was the culmination of a 16-week dry spell - the longest recorded over England and Wales since 1727.

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© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem 2014
Vue Panoramique

It is 1976..So why that

summer ?

That year, that summer. What a year and it is still talked about with great fondness by the Class of 77. We were in the Lower 6th form. We were a year on from O Levels (as was) and a year away from A levels..so it was party time much to the chgrin of the staff! We were also beginning to get mopeds and motorcycles and even cars..things were gettin’ better !

Occaecat magna

esse ad enim

pariatur

The summer of 1976 was the hottest summer in the UK since records began. The temperature reached 80°F (26.7°C) every day between 22 June and 16 July. The truly remarkable heat wave was in late June and early July. For 15 consecutive days from 23 June to 7 July inclusive, temperatures reached 90°F (32.2°C) somewhere in England on each of these 15 days. Furthermore, five days saw temperatures exceed 95°F (35°C). On 28 June, temperatures reached 35.6°C (96.1°F) in Southampton, the highest June temperature recorded in the UK. The hottest day of all was 3 July, with temperatures reaching 35.9°C (96.6°F) in Cheltenham, one of the hottest July days on record in the UK. The drought was at its most severe in August 1976. Parts of the south west went 45 days without any rain in July and August. As the hot, dry weather continued, devastating heath and forest fires broke out in parts of Southern England. 50,000 trees were destroyed at Hurn Forest in Dorset. Crops were badly hit, with £500 million worth of crops failing. Food prices subsequently increased by 12% [1]. The effect on domestic water supplies led to the passing of a Drought Act by parliament and Minister for Drought, Denis Howell, was appointed. There was widespread water rationing and public standpipes in some affected areas. Reservoirs were at an extremely low level, as were some rivers. The rivers Don, Sheaf, Shire Brook and Meers Brook (all in Sheffield) all ran completely dry, without a drop of water in any of them, as well as Frecheville Pond and Carterhall Pond (Carterhall Pond was permanently dry until 2007, when floods hit, and has never dried since). In the Central England Temperature series 1976 has the hottest summer for more than 350 years and probably for much longer. The average temperature over the whole summer (June, July, August) was 17.77°C, compared to the average for the unusually warm current decade (2001- 2008) of 16.30°C.[1] There have in other years been hotter specific summer months, though. For the entire period much of Europe was bathed in continual sunshine with the United Kingdom seeing an average of more than 14 hours of sunshine per day. 1976 was dubbed "The year of the Ladybird" in that country due to the rise in the mass numbers of ladybirds brought on by the long hot period. "The long hot summer of 1976 which eventually ended in September of that year, was the culmination of a 16-week dry spell - the longest recorded over England and Wales since 1727.

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